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Boston Neighborhoods

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Boston is a city of neighborhoods, each with it’s own character. When choosing a neighborhood, consider the following: How many roommates do I want to have? What neighborhoods can I afford? How far away do I want to be from the College? What is the closest method of public transportation? How loud or quiet is the location? Are services and stores such as supermarkets, banks, laundromats, and restaurants nearby?

Learn more about some neighborhoods in which NECO students often choose to live.

Back Bay

Many students choose to live in this neighborhood since Back Bay is home to historic Victorian brownstones, the Boston Public Library, and some of Boston’s tallest office buildings. NECO is located in this neighborhood, and many students choose to live here in order to walk to class. Rent in Back Bay varies, but typically ranges from $1800 per month for a studio to $2500 per month for a two bedroom apartment.

Fun fact: Back Bay was literally a bay, and it was filled during the late 1800’s to create buildable land.  

Fenway/Kenmore

The Fenway/Kenmore neighborhood is home to Fenway Park, the Museum of Fine Arts and the Boston Symphony Orchestra, as well as restaurants, shops, and nightlife. This neighborhood is within a 15-30 minute walk from NECO and is also accessible by public transportation. The neighborhood also includes other colleges and other library options for students to use for studying. Rent in Fenway/Kenmore varies, but typically ranges from $1600 per month for a studio to $2200 for a two-bedroom apartment.

Fun fact: Fenway Park, home of the Boston Red Sox, is the oldest ballpark in the United States.

Brighton/Allston

The Brighton/Allston neighborhoods are home to a large college student population and unique coffee shops, restaurants and boutiques. Brighton/Allston is widely accessible by public transportation, with multiple bus lines and the green MBTA subway line arrive to stops near NECO within 30 minutes. Rent in Brighton/Allston varies, but typically ranges from $1500 per month for a studio to $2000 for a two-bedroom apartment.

Fun fact: Brighton/Allston became a part of Boston in 1874, received one of the earlier street car lines, and became one of the nation’s first “streetcar suburbs” in 1889.

Coolidge Corner & Washington Square

Located in the neighboring town of Brookline, the Coolidge Corner and Washington Square neighborhoods are residential areas that host small boutiques, coffee shops and restaurants. The MBTA Green subway line runs through both of these neighborhoods, and arrives to stops near NECO within 20-30 minutes. Rent in these neighborhoods varies, but typically ranges from $1500 per month for a studio to $2100 per month for a two-bedroom apartment.

Fun fact: President John F. Kennedy was born in Brookline and his childhood home has been named a National Historic Site.

Harvard & Central Square

Located in Cambridge, Harvard and Central Squares are residential areas that are home to unique restaurants, parks and theaters. Public transportation is widely available, and the #1 bus line runs through both neighborhoods. Starting in Harvard Square, the bus line arrives to its stop one block away from NECO within 25 minutes. Rent in Cambridge can vary greatly, but typically ranges from $1500 per month for a studio to $2200 per month for a two-bedroom apartment.

Fun fact: Actors Matt Damon and Ben Affleck grew up in Cambridge and have been friends since childhood.  

South End

The South End neighborhood is located next to Back Bay. It is primarily a residential area with beautiful brownstone style housing, but also includes some of the city’s premiere restaurants, quaint cafes, beautiful art galleries, and a great  deal of shopping. From here, most students choose to walk to school. The MBTA Orange subway line and commuter rail are also easily accessible. Rents can vary in this neighborhood, but can range from $1800 per month for a studio to $2500 per month for a two-bedroom apartment.

Fun fact: Filled with beautiful Victorian townhouses, the South End was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973 as "the largest urban Victorian neighborhood in the country." (source: Boston.gov)

Jamaica Plain

Jamaica Plain, or "JP" as it is called by locals, is located a little farther down the MBTA Orange Line.  This larger neighborhood of Boston is more residential and includes larger parks, including Jamaica Pond and Arnold Arboretum where you can find residents in any weather. Rents can vary in this neighborhood, but can range from $1500 per month for a studio to $2000 per month for a two-bedroom apartment.

Fun fact: Jamaica Pond, Arnold Arboretum, and Franklin Park in Jamaica Plain are all part of the historic Emerald Necklace, a series of connected parks designed by landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted. 

For further descriptions and information, please visit the City of Boston’s website