New England College of Optometry 2014-2015 Catalog
 
 
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Department of Vision Science Courses

(VS21203) Binocular Vision and Ocular Motility 
Instructor of Record: Glen McCormack, OD, PhD

This course presents elements of binocular vision and ocular motility. Binocular vision topics include oculocentric and egocentric localization, binocular correspondence and the horopter, fusion and Panum’s areas, binocular rivalry and suppression, depth cues and stereopsis, stereoacuity, and the pathophysiological aspects of strabismus, amblyopia, and stereoblindness. The ocular motility material includes principles of saccadic, pursuit, vestibular, optokinetic, vergence, and accommodative movements and addresses the anatomical, kinematic, physiological, cybernetic, and pathophysiological properties of ocular motility. Laboratory sessions support the lecture material with hands-on experiments.

(VS11210) Color Vision
Instructor of Record: TBA

This course presents the theory of the measurement of color and the neurophysiology of color vision. The course includes the theory of the construction of color vision tests and of the differential diagnosis of congenital and acquired color vision defects.

(VS21217A)  Lectures in Binocular Vision
Instructor of Record: Glen McCormack, OD, PhD

This course presents elements of binocular vision. Topics include oculocentric and egocentric localization, binocular correspondence and the horopter, fusion and Panum’s areas, binocular rivalry and suppression, depth cues and stereopsis, stereoacuity, and the pathophysiological aspects of strabismus, amblyopia, and stereoblindness.

(VS21218A)  Lectures in Ocular Motility
Instructor of Record: Glen McCormack, OD, PhD

This course presents elements of ocular motility. Topics include principles of saccadic, pursuit, vestibular, optokinetic, vergence, and accommodative movements and addresses the anatomical, kinematic, physiological, cybernetic, and pathophysiological properties of ocular motility.

(VS21009) Lighting Measurement 
Instructors of Record: Nancy J. Coletta, OD, PhD

This course covers light measurement and light hazards; topics include radiometry and photometry, ambient radiation, glare and lighting design, and photic damage to the eye.

(VS21207) Neural Basis of Vision 
(VS21291A) Neural Basis of Vision 
Instructor of Record: Frank Thorn, OD, PhD

This course shows how the retina and the brain work together to produce human vision.  The course centers on the encoding and transmission of information through single neurons in the visual system, and the relationship between this information and specific aspects of human vision. The central visual system and a variety of higher cerebral cortex areas are examined for their role in vision and visually-guided behavior. Upon completing this course, a student should feel comfortable with his or her understanding of how an image on the retina is translated into visual information and how the brain processes the information.

(VS11001) Optics I 
Instructor of Record: Nancy J. Coletta, OD, PhD

This course provides the student with the basic theory of optics as it relates to optometric refraction, ophthalmic corrective lenses, ophthalmic instruments, and low vision devices. In addition, the course covers the optical properties of the eye and the techniques used for assessing these properties. Topics include vergence, refraction, reflection, ray tracing, prisms, thin and thick lenses, mirrors, optical models of the eye, refractive errors, and optical effects of correcting lenses. Laboratory sessions support the lecture material with hands-on experiments.

(VS11002) Optics II
Instructor of Record: Nancy J. Coletta, OD, PhD

This course emphasizes the application of geometric optics to the properties of ophthalmic lenses, including the imaging properties of sphero-cylindrical lenses, base curves, lens thickness, magnification properties, lens shapes, and prismatic effects of lenses. Additional material covers principles of ophthalmic optical devices for low vision, including the magnification and field properties of telescopes and magnifiers. Lensometry skills, eyewear design, and the production of eyewear are included in the laboratory.

(VS21003) Optics III 
Instructors of Record: Ernest Loewenstein, OD, PhD, and Nancy J. Coletta, OD, PhD

This course covers physical optics, aberrations, and light measurement. Topics include light scatter, polarization, interference, diffraction, and factors that set limitations on the sensitivity and resolving power of optical instruments, including the eye. Additional material covers measurement of light, ambient radiation, lasers, photic damage to the eye, wavefront aberrations and optical quality, and advanced ophthalmic imaging methods.

(VS11081A) Optics A 
Instructor of Record: Guang-Ji Wang, MD, OD

The objectives of the Optics A course are to provide students with the basic science and skills of optics with geometric and physical properties which are necessary for understanding refraction, ophthalmic lenses, ophthalmic instruments and the human eye’s optical system. This course will cover traditional optics including geometric optics, physical optics, and visual optics. The topics will be related to the clinical examination of optical and visual function. Fundamental principles, concepts, and equations will be presented in the lecture sessions, and sample problems will be solved in class. The laboratory sessions support the lecture material with hands-on experiments.

(VS21082A) Optics B 
Instructor of Record: Blair Wong, ABOM

This course emphasizes the application of geometric optics to the properties of ophthalmic lenses including the imaging properties of sphero-cylindrical lenses, base curves, lens thickness, magnification properties, lens shapes, and prismatic effects of lenses. Lensometry skills, eyewear design, and the production of eyewear are included in the laboratory.

(VS31006) Solving Complex Refractive Issues
Instructor of Record: Blair Wong, ABOM

This course presents the optometric approach to optimal patient care through the clinical visualization, analysis, application and ultimate design specific to ophthalmic prescription eyewear and contact lenses. A thorough review of intermediate level optics will be presented in the beginning of the course as a means to prepare students for case analyses involving anisometropia, aniseikonia, post-cataract care and post corneal surgical considerations. Upon completion of this course, students will develop a greater understanding for the delivery of optimal optometric patient care, and analyze patients’ eye care and eyewear needs in regards to refraction, frame selection, and ophthalmic lens selection.

(VS11201) Theory and Methods of Vision Testing 
(VS11202A) Theory and Methods of Vision Testing 
Instructor of Record: TBA

The parameters that affect vision tests are discussed, together with a survey of concepts used in the field of vision testing. Light detection, spectral sensitivity, dark adaptation, visual acuity and spatial vision, and flicker perception are addressed. Psychophysical methodologies are also discussed. The strengths and weaknesses of these techniques for measuring vision are covered, and modern alternative techniques are introduced.

Perceptual processes are addressed, including the effect of eye movements on perception, visual masking, size and distance perception, direction perception and motion perception. Clinical implications of these phenomena are emphasized.

Finally, high-order visual activity and the influence of non-visual factors such as attention and memory upon visual perception are covered. Form perception, recognition, illusions and visual imagery are addressed. Reading, reading problems and dyslexia are also discussed.

(VS21292A) Visual Development 
Instructor of Record:  Frank Thorn, OD, PhD

This course presents the development of normal and abnormal vision, from the basic underlying principles and supporting science to the diagnosis and management of clinical conditions resulting from abnormal development, such as strabismus and amblyopia. Basic topics include: the testing of vision in human infants, the normal and abnormal development of the neural visual system in animals, the effects of monocular eye closure, strabismus, anisometropia and astigmatism on the development of the visual system and visual behavior, and the critical period for neural flexibility. Research on the nature of vision in amblyopia and binocular vision loss in patients is then described and related to the mechanisms revealed in the first parts of the course.