New England College of Optometry 2013-2014 Catalog
 
 
The College
Faculty Listing
Academic Programs
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Department of Primary Care Courses

(PC32001) Advanced Diagnostic Techniques
(PC32002) Advanced Diagnostic Techniques I
(PC32003) Advanced Diagnostic Techniques II
Instructor of Record: TBA

The Advanced Diagnostics Techniques Course (ADT) is a lecture and laboratory course designed to introduce third year optometry students to advanced screening, diagnostic, and therapeutic techniques. Topics covered in this course include: ocular ultrasound (A and B scan), corneal foreign body removal, dilation and irrigation of the lacrimal drainage system, scleral depression, and intramuscular/intravenous injections on a artificial injection arm.

(PC12041) Clinical Reasoning Ia
 Instructor of Record: Aurora Denial, OD

This is a core course for all first-year students. It is mainly lecture-based and provides foundational information for the entire sequence of clinical reasoning courses. The purpose of this course is to develop an appreciation for clinical thought processes, provide an opportunity to integrate the knowledge base into a clinical scenario, and to develop skills in the clinical thought process. The course emphasizes strategies for diagnosis, problem solving, and learning, with specific attention given to problem identification, understanding points of view, and assumptions. This course will be graded honors, pass, or fail. One grade will be issued at the end of the spring semester. A criterion for grading has been established if a student does not complete the two semesters.

(PC12042) Clinical Reasoning Ib
 Instructor of Record: Aurora Denial, OD

This is a core course for all first-year students. The spring course is a small group discussion format highlighting case discussions and “personal patient” presentations by students. This course emphasizes application of strategies learned in the fall. This course will help to develop the cognitive skills needed for patient care. The course is graded honors, pass, or fail.

(PC22041) Clinical Reasoning II
Instructor of Record: Aurora Denial, OD

This is a core course presented to students at the end of their second year of study. The purpose of the course is to develop the clinical thought process and integration of knowledge. This course emphasizes forming a differential diagnosis and an appropriate data base. Skills learned in the first-year course, along with clinical experience, are applied to cases and presentations. The course is graded pass or fail.

(PC32041) Clinical Reasoning III
 Instructor of Record: Aurora Denial, OD

This is a core course for all third-year students. This course emphasizes all aspects of clinical reasoning and patient care, with special attention to diagnosis and management of ocular diseases/conditions. The course is graded pass or fail.

(PC22080A) Introduction to Clinical Care
Instructor of Record: Bina Patel, OD

This intent of this course is to assimilate previously-acquired optometric skills, both educational and via clinical practice, into American-based optometry, including terminology, aspects of public health, visual field and application, and an introduction to billing procedures and standards of care. Credentialing in order to proceed to patient care is achieved upon successful completion of this course.

(PC22701) Ophthalmic Business and Management Policy I
(PC32702) Ophthalmic Business and Management Policy II  
Instructor of Record: David Mills, OD, MBA

These courses endeavor to teach students the knowledge, skill, and background required to manage an ophthalmic business in all eye and health care delivery systems. Topics include goal setting, patient communication, office design, accounting and finance in an optometric setting, fee computation, practice purchase valuation, human resources, relevant business law, professional liability and risk management, and marketing. The development of a formal business plan is required.

(PC12005) Principles and Practice of Optometry Ia  
(PC12006) Principles and Practice of Optometry Ib  
Instructor of Record: Nancy Carlson, OD

This is a two-semester, team-taught course that prepares first-year students to participate in vision screenings and clerkships by teaching the basic principles of clinical science and patient care. In this course, the student acquires the knowledge, technical skills, professional attitudes and ethics needed to participate in patient care. This course includes both lectures and vision screenings, optometry clinical observations, and medical clinical laboratory sessions throughout the year.

(PC22010) Principles and Practice of Optometry
Instructor of Record: Maureen Hanley, OD
(PC22007) Principles and Practice of Optometry IIa  
(PC22008) Principles and Practice of Optometry IIb

Instructors of Record: Bina Patel, OD and Maureen Hanley, OD

Upon completing this course, the student will achieve a moderately-high level of competence with respect to a modest list of patient presentations commonly encountered by primary care optometrists. By the course’s end, the student will be able to conduct a comprehensive, primary-care optometric examination, reach a diagnosis, and outline a management plan for the vast majority of patients seen during the third-year clinical program. The course will cover the general areas of ocular disease, refraction, functional vision analysis, and patient communication.

(PC12081A) Principles and Practice of Optometry A  
Instructor of Record: Nancy Carlson, OD

This is a team-taught course that prepares students to participate in vision screenings and clerkships by teaching the basic principles of clinical science and patient care. In this course, the student will acquire the knowledge, technical skills, professional attitudes and ethics needed to participate in patient care. This course includes both lectures and vision screenings, laboratory sessions, optometry clinical observations, and medical clinical observations throughout the term.

(PC22082A) Principles and Practice of Optometry B  
Instructor of Record: Nancy Carlson, OD

Upon completing this course, the student will achieve a moderately-high level of competence with respect to a modest list of patient presentations commonly encountered by primary care optometrists. By the course’s end, the student will be able to conduct a comprehensive, primary-care optometric examination, reach a diagnosis, and outline a management plan for the vast majority of patients seen during the year. The course will cover the general areas of ocular disease, refraction, functional vision analysis, and patient communication.

(PC22083A) Principles and Practice of Optometry C
Instructor of Record: Bina Patel, OD

This course provides the foundation for the differentiation of normal and abnormal presentations of the anterior and posterior aspects of the eye and ocular adnexae, and is integrated with basic science principles of ocular physiology of the eye. The ocular physiology principles are applied to the normal function of ocular tissues that are commonly compromised in disease, with clinical presentation of signs and symptoms that may result. Laboratory sessions teach the students how to perform diagnostic skills and how to interpret clinical techniques used to assess ocular health status.     

(PC12401) Vision Health Care 1A          
Instructor of Record: Gary Chu, OD, MPH                                                                 

The content of this course is a requisite for all first-year students and requires a passing grade to meet satisfactory completion of the first-year curriculum. The instructors have expertise in public health aspects of clinical care. This course presents social, ethical, and policy issues to optometrists-in-training at the beginning of their first professional year, prior to their being exposed to patient care. The course is designed to provide the underpinnings to practicing the profession of optometry in a caring, competent manner within the current health care environment.

(PC12402) Vision Health Care 1B      
Instructor of Record: Gary Chu, OD, MPH

This one-credit course consists of two graded projects. The first is a community analysis project, in which each student identifies a community’s need for eye care services, based on a demographic, socio-economic analysis of the community’s population. Students assess the supply of eye care services by determining the number of FTE providers who are available to the public at-large, or who are limited in either their scope of practice or their availability to provide services to the community. Each student is required to identify and to conduct two in-depth interviews with optometrists from his or her community.

The second project is a group public health project in which each group, under the guidance of a faculty advisor, identifies a public health issue within the scope of this project. The project can be an assessment that quantifies the magnitude and importance of the problem, or it can identify elements of the problem that are amenable to intervention, or it can include an intervention in which the impact is a measurable outcome.  The group summarizes their project in a standard poster format and presents it in a competitive poster session that is judged by public health experts from the Greater Boston community.